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  1. The United States dollar ( symbol: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ or U.S. Dollar, to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies; referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, American dollar, or colloquially buck) is the official currency of the United States and several other countries.

    • USD (numeric: .mw-parser-output .monospaced{font-family:monospace,monospace}840)
    • Federal Reserve
    • April 2, 1792; 230 years ago
    • $, US$, U$‎
  2. Il dollaro statunitense (il simbolo: $, il codice ISO 4217: USD; in inglese: United States dollar, ma chiamato informalmente anche dollar, American dollar o semplicemente buck in patria) è la valuta ufficiale degli Stati Uniti d'America. È anche utilizzato come valuta di riserva al di fuori della nazione. Il dollaro è diviso in 100 centesimi.

    • United States dollar
    • $, US$, U$
    • Denominations and Value
    • Federal Reserve
    • Meeting The Variable Demand For Cash
    • Maintaining A Cash Inventory
    • Gallery

    The American one dollar bill has a picture of George Washington. There are currently paperbills (currency) of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 dollars. All U.S. dollar currency has been the same size, shape and general design since 1928. This is unlike some countries where bank notes with different values have different sizes. The U.S. also has dollar ...

    The paper "dollar bill" is actually called a "Federal ReserveNote". Federal Reserve notes are legal tender currency notes. The twelve Federal Reserve Banks issue them into circulation pursuant to the Federal Reserve Act of 1913. A commercial bank belonging to the Federal Reserve System can obtain Federal Reserve notes from the Federal Reserve Bank ...

    The public typically obtains its cash from banks by withdrawing cash from automated teller machines (ATMs) or by cashing checks. The amount of cash that the public holds varies seasonally, by the day of the month, and even by the day of the week. For example, people demand a large amount of cash for shopping and vacations during the year-end holida...

    Each of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks keeps an inventory of cash on hand to meet the needs of the depository institutions in its District. Extended custodial inventory sites in several continents promote the use of U.S. currency internationally, improve the collection of information on currency flows, and help local banks meet the public's demand fo...

    The Great Seal of the United Statesis on the back of the $1 Bill
    the back of the bill showing the signing of the Declaration of Independence
    • Origins: The Spanish Dollar
    • Continental Currency
    • Coinage Act of 1792
    • 19th Century
    • Gold Standard
    • Note Issuance
    • Use as International Reserve Currency
    • Fiat Standard
    • Color and Design
    • See Also

    The United States Mint commenced production of the United States dollar in 1792 as a local version of the popular Spanish dollar or piece of eight produced in Spanish America and widely circulated throughout the Americas from the 16th to the 19th centuries. Made with similar silver content to its counterparts minted in Mexico and Peru, the Spanish,...

    After the American Revolutionary War began in 1775, the Continental Congress began issuing paper money known as Continental currency, or Continentals. Continental currency was denominated in dollars from $1⁄6 to $80, including many odd denominations in between. During the Revolution, Congress issued $241,552,780 in Continental currency. By the end ...

    On July 6, 1785, the Continental Congress of the United States authorized the issuance of a new currency, the US dollar. The word dollar is derived from Low Saxon cognate of the High German Thaler; the term had already been in common usage since the colonial period when it referred to eight-real coin (Spanish dollar) or the "Spanish milled dollar" ...

    In the early 19th century, the intrinsic value of gold coins rose relative to their nominal equivalent in silver coins, resulting in the removal from commerce of nearly all gold coins, and their subsequent private melting. Therefore, in the Coinage Act of 1834, the 15:1 ratio of silver to gold was changed to a 16:1 ratio by reducing the weight of t...

    Note: all references to 'ounce' in this section are to the troy ounce as used for precious metals, rather than to the (smaller) avoirdupois ounce used in the United States customary unitssystem for other goods. Bimetallism persisted until March 14, 1900, with the passage of the Gold Standard Act,which provided that: Thus the United States moved to ...

    Silver certificates

    United States silver certificates were a type of representative money printed from 1878 to 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. They were produced in response to silver agitation by citizens who were angered by the Fourth Coinage Act, and were used alongside the gold-based dollar notes. The silver certificates were initially redeemable in the same face value of silver dollar coins, and later in raw silver bullion. Since the early 1920s, silver certificates w...

    United States Notes

    A United States Note, also known as a Legal Tender Note, was a type of paper money that was issued from 1862 to 1971 in the U.S. Having been current for over 100 years, they were issued for longer than any other form of U.S. paper money. They were known popularly as "greenbacks" in their day, a name inherited from the Demand Notesthat they replaced in 1862. While issuance of United States Notes ended in January 1971, existing United States Notes are still valid currency in the United States t...

    Federal Reserve Notes

    Congress continued to issue paper money after the Civil War, the most important of which was the Federal Reserve Note that was authorized by the Federal Reserve Act of 1913. Since the discontinuation of all other types of notes (Gold Certificates in 1933, Silver Certificates in 1963, and United States Notes in 1971), US dollar notes have since been issued exclusively as Federal Reserve Notes.

    History

    World War II devastated European and Asian economies while leaving the United States' economy relatively unharmed.As European governments exhausted their gold reserves and borrowed to pay the United States for war material, the United States accumulated large gold reserves. This combination gave the United States significant political and economic power following the war. The Bretton Woods agreement codified this economic dominance of the dollar after the war. In 1944, Allied nations sought t...

    Impact

    The United States enjoys some benefits because the dollar serves as the international reserve currency. The United States is less likely to face a balance of paymentscrisis.

    Today, like the currency of most nations, the dollar is fiat money, unbacked by any physical asset. A holder of a federal reserve note has no right to demand an asset such as gold or silver from the government in exchange for a note. Consequently, some proponents of the intrinsic theory of valuebelieve that the near-zero marginal cost of production...

    The federal government began issuing paper currency during the American Civil War. As photographic technology of the day could not reproduce color, it was decided the back of the bills would be printed in a color other than black. Because the color green was seen as a symbol of stability, it was selected. These were known as "greenbacks" for their ...

    • Caratteristiche
    • Storia
    • Voci Correlate

    Il primo presidente degli Stati Uniti d'America (1789-1797), George Washington, dipinto da Gilbert Stuart, si trova sul dritto, mentre il Gran Sigillo degli Stati Uniti è presente sul retro. La banconota da un dollaro è la più antica banconota statunitense ancora in fase di produzione. Il design odierno ha debuttato nel 1963, quando vennero emesse ...

    Dimensioni: circa 7,4218 × 3⅛ pollici ≅ 189 × 79 millimetri 1. 1863: La prima banconota da un dollaro è stato emessa come un Legal Tender Note (banconota degli Stati Uniti) con un ritratto di Salmon P. Chase, Segretario del Tesoro sotto il presidente Abraham Lincoln 1. 1869: La banconota è ridisegnata con un ritratto di George Washington al centro ...

  3. Le monete del dollaro statunitense vengono coniate ogni anno negli Stati Uniti d'America a partire dal 1792. Vi sono sei tagli in circolazione: 1 centesimo, 5 centesimi, 10 centesimi, 25 centesimi, 50 centesimi e 1 dollaro. Tutte queste monete, realizzate dalla United States Mint, vengono consegnate alle 12 Federal Reserve Banks, che a loro volta hanno la responsabilità di immetterle in circolazione e/o ritirarle. Per il conio delle monete del dollaro statunitense sono operative ...