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  1. Career. In 1458, the chapter of the Quedlinburg Abbey elected the 12-year-old Hedwig as successor to Princess-Abbess Anna I, who had died aged 42. In 1460, the Princess-Abbess faced a rebellion when the city of Quedlinburg joined the Hanseatic League, attempting to gain independence from her and become a free imperial city. Gebhard von Hoym ...

  2. Quedlinburg Abbey was an Imperial Estate and one of the approximately forty self-ruling Imperial Abbeys of the Holy Roman Empire. It was disestablished in 1802/3. The church, known as Stiftskirche St Servatius, is now used by the Lutheran Evangelical Church in Germany . The castle, abbey, church, and surrounding buildings are exceptionally well ...

  3. Media in category "Hedwig, Abbess of Quedlinburg" The following 3 files are in this category, out of 3 total. Erath 1764 Taf XLI 4 Hedwig v S.jpg 386 × 366; 177 KB

  4. She was the first Protestant Abbess of Quedlinburg, having embraced Lutheranism in 1539. Anna did not dare to express her Evangelical confession during the reign of George, Duke of Saxony . However, George died in 1539 and was succeeded by his Protestant brother, Henry IV , which left Anna II free to publicly express her Lutheran faith and introduce the Reformation to Quedlinburg. [1]

  5. Two years later, Adelaide succeeded her half-sister as Princess-Abbess of Quedlinburg; she was possibly ordained in Goslar Cathedral at Pentecost 1063, witnessing the violent Precedence Dispute. In Gandersheim, already the appointment of Beatrice in 1043 (at the age of seven) by King Henry III had caused trouble with the canonesses insisting on their autonomy and electoral rights.

  6. Hedwig of Saxony (31 October 1445 – 13 June 1511) was Princess-Abbess of Quedlinburg from 1458 until her death. 36 relations.

  7. Nevertheless, she was elected to succeed Anna Sophia I as princess-abbess of Quedlinburg in 1681 under the name Anna Sophia II. The sick abbess selected Duchess Anna Dorothea of Saxe-Weimar as her coadjutor in 1683. Anna Sophia II succumbed to her illness (likely tuberculosis) later that year, after only two years of reign, and was succeeded by ...